Hammond, Louisiana-Campbell


Photo Collection


HAMMOND, LOUISIANA-CAMPBELL PICTURES

Pix # Date of Pix Size of Pix No. of Pix Kind of image Negative

1 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

House of Mrs. Ralph W. Wilson who is the former Elaine Gautreaux. Former owners were Dr. and Mrs. Valmond Joseph Gautreaux, Hodding Carter, and James McCarroll who built the house.

2 unknown 5 x 7 5 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Linda and Ken Ross home. House was built the O. C. Pantalls of Little Rock, Illinois. It was also owned by Dr. and Mrs. Walter H. Brent and the L. J. Patenottes.

3 unknown 5 x 7 4 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Ben E. Pierce home?

4 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Ben E. Pierce home?

5 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Queen Ann home of Charles and Barbara Haney. It was built in 1895 by Ralph and Harriet June.

6 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Two-story, white framework house, known as the J. H. P. Mitchell home on N. Magnolia Street, was built during the infancy of Hammond by Charles Emery Cate. When purchased by Mitchell around 1922, it was owned by James Hunter. It has had many occupants. It is now owned by Jan Larry Moody who have turned it into a business called "Granny’s Fabrics."

7 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Edward L. McGehee home at 1106 South Holly. It has been the McGehee home for four generations. The Southern Colonial type house was built in 1906, when E. L. McGehee came to Hammond to practice medicine. Present owners are E. L. McGehee III and his wife Augusta.

8 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Two-story annex to the Oaks Hotel built by Col. and Mrs. Robinson after fire destroyed the hotel in 1905. It was built as an entertainment center for guests at the hotel. It was constructed with an upper story to be used to provide rooms for employees. Later, this building was made into apartments, and many of Hammond’s townspeople occupied them. It was condemned in July 1973 by the Hammond Zoining Board and the City Council. Timothy Higgins, partner with James H. Morrison, purchased the building with plans to build a house from the salvaged lumber.

9 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

S. L. U. Alumni Association house when it was the Samuel Hill home. It shows Mr. & Mrs. Hill and son Lindsay seated on the front porch. Hayward and family donated it to SLU. c. 1894.

10 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Home on corner of N. Magnolia and W. Robert streets. It is part of the first home built by Charles Emery Cate. The main section was destroyed by fire in the 1860s. This portion had been moved and faces Cate Square. Marybelle Bass, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Nye S. Bass lives there today.

HAMMOND, LOUISIANA-CAMPBELL PICTURES-Continued

Pix # Date of Pix Size of Pix No. of Pix Kind of image Negative

11 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Home of Hammond’s pioneer druggist, corner of W. Michigan and N. Pine streets, Dr. Robinson was the first owner of Central Drugs.

12 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Home of pioneer teacher Annie Eastman for whom school was name, S. Cherry Street.

13 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

LSU Experimental Farm; first home of Edna Szymoniak. Edna’s husband Bill established the LSU Experimental Station.

14 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

First boarding house built by Cate for his workmen is believed to be the only building of that time which is still intact. In later years the boarding house was moved from its site, the present-day location of the West Thomas Street Citizens National Bank building. The structure was divided into two sections. The half section which was moved to South Magnolia Street and was the Saxon home has been demolished; the other section remains intact on South Spruce Street and is occupied by Gladys Tycer Norman, a daughter of the Bob Tycers, owners of the house.

15 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

First boarding house. See above.

16 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

First hospital in the 1896 era was owned by Dr. E. L. McGehee and was located on South Holly Street. Today the E. L. McGehee home is across the street.

17 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

House a 306 North Oak Street was built in the 1860s. The Morrison Square was first settled by Robert Wilson Morrison and Henrietta Maria Mann Morrison in the early 1860s. It is said to have been the first land sold by developer Charles Emery Cate. In fact, the square is bounded on the south by Robert Street, the name chosen by Cate when he laid out the town and named the first street for Morrison. The other boundary streets are West Church, North Oak and Southwest Railroad Avenue. (However, the most easily understood directions for locating the square are, "across the street from the Illinois Central Railroad depot" and "opposite the Grace Memorial Episcopal Church.")

18 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Clarke Home. The Gordon Whitley home originally was part of the Paul Clarke Estate, and adjoins Clarke Park.

19 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Zemurray Gardens in early years a tourist attraction now owned by Reimers Trust.

HAMMOND, LOUISIANA-CAMPBELL PICTURES-Continued

Pix # Date of Pix Size of Pix No. of Pix Kind of image Negative

20 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

The Mr. and Mrs. John E. Wilcombe Home which was located on the corner of West Morris and South Magnolia Streets and was supposedly built by Mr. Wilcombe’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Wilcombe in the mid-1860s. Joseph Wilcombe came to Hammond from Pittsfield, Mass., several years after the Charles Emery Cates settled here, to manage the Cate shoe factory. The wide verandas completely encircling the front section of the house, featured railed bannisters and large columns. Old fashioned French wooden blinds flanked the windows of both stories. The spacious rambling house faced West Morris Street and the grounds extended the full length of the block. Oaks and shrubbery formed background interest.

21 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Breckwoldt Hotel, a summer resort inn, occupied the site that is today River Oaks subdivision. The location is about five miles east of Hammond. In October 1894 Frank Breckwoldt and his wife Anna migrated to Hammond from Dubuque, Ohio and built a large, wide-spreading framework house on the river bank. Shortly after Frank died decided to stay at the farm site which they had named "Wishing Springs" because of the many springs round the grounds. Through a suggestion from Col. H. W. Robinson she started a lodging place there.

22 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Dr. James L. and Glenda Nelson home. The house is the former home of Jared Y. Sanders a Louisiana governor. The street on which the house is located was originally Saunders Street, but was renamed Sanders Avenue in deference to the former governor.

23 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

The Gould Home. George Gould, who still lived in the house and on the grounds purchased by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Marvin Gould in 1887. Mr. Gould was told that the property was the last deed signed by Mr. C. E. Cate.

24 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Old Richardson Home, was Episcopal Kindergarten, Hammond Oak Apartment Complex.

25 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

M. J. Darerny home on N. Pine. Picture by Andrew Dagre, Independence, LA

26 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

"Villars." Captain F. A. Stinson of Bath, ME sailed from that port when a boy and for many years was in command of the Prussia, Scotia, and other ships. When he tired of the sea, he moved to the vicinity of Hammond on what is now an airport. It has ties with Stinson and Baltzell families.

27 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Hans Schnieder Home, 802 West Thomas Street, is one of beauty, reflecting Southern Colonial architectural lines. Select, long-leaf pine lumber was used in the construction of the house, which was built in 1900. Mrs. Schneider is the niece of the original owner, E. P. Denkman, of Rock Island, Illinois. The Schneider property adjoins that of the late F. W. Reimers, Mrs. Schneider’s parents.

HAMMOND, LOUISIANA-CAMPBELL PICTURES-Continued

Pix # Date of Pix Size of Pix No. of Pix Kind of image Negative

28 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Cate-Fourmy office complex in the second block of West Thomas Street. This structure has a history of housing an early Studebaker automobile plant in the section now Locascio’s Building Supplies, a Ford automobile office and showroom in the middle section. The Citizens National Bank had temporary quarters in this portion while the present West Thomas Street building was under construction. The third section houses the Dameron-Jones Insurance Agency. Ned Dameron is a Cate descendant.

29 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Monteleon’s Shoe Shop.

30 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

F. D. W. J. Rolling, General Blacksmithing, tow-work, corner of E. Hanson Ave. and South Cypress.

31 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Old Diamond Hammond Machine Shop was the Mecca for business people and area residents. The shop was located on the corner of East Coleman and South Cypress streets-later the site of the Hammond Coca Cola Plant.

32 unknown 5 x 7 3 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Early Thomas Street looking east. There is a fire truck on the corner.

33 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Fire truck with five men on it.

34 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Early photo of Carr’s Printing Shop on S. Cypress Street, Model T cars struggle over muddy streets.

35 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Gene Taylor who has been with Maurin Motors for many years is pictured with one of the new gold tellephones in the Maurin office.

36 unknown 5 x 7 2 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

On left is Duke Callaham, camera operator. On the right is Otto Preminger, directing filming of scenes of Hurry Sundown at Hammond’s Grace Memorial Episcopal Church in 1966.

37 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Group of boys and girls standing on the steps of a building.

38 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Anna Breckwoldt feeding her flock of chickens.

HAMMOND, LOUISIANA-CAMPBELL PICTURES-Continued

Pix # Date of Pix Size of Pix No. of Pix Kind of image Negative

39 unknown 5 x 7 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

George Neelis home, located at 501 North Pine Street. They had three daughters, Evelyn and Cora (both deceased) and Mrs. Buford Thames, and son George Neelis.

40 unknown 8 x 10 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Feed and Seed Warehouse of B. M. Morrison which was located on North Cherry Street in the approximate location of Fire Station #2. There is a horse and wagon and five men standing beside it.

41 unknown 8 x 10 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Early store of Benjamin Mann Morrison on the corner of Thomas and Cypress streets. The large building in the right background was known as the "Andrews House," a boarding home on the corner of Charles and Cherry street. There are two men and two young boys standing in front of it.

42 unknown 8 x 10 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

A group of men and women, some sitting on chairs and some standing outside.

43 unknown 8 x 10 1 B&W copy print 1½ x 2 B&W

Group of boys and girls standing in front of a building.