Conference Schedule

 

Please use the archived schedule on this page for any information that applies to your CE requirements. 

2023

TBD

2022

Terrell Conference

Friday, January 7, 2022

7:30a.m. - 8:30a.m.     Registration / Networking / EXPO

8:30a.m. - 10:00a.m.   Dr. Philip Hemphill, LCSW, "Clinical Decisions through the Ethical Lens"

Learning Goals:

1. Explore professionalism in both individuals and groups while reinforcing standards and ethics.

2. Through didactic and interacting in small group discussions of self-care, boundaries and professionalism you will learn effective tools and processes for managing relationships and distressing life events. 

3. Understanding the expectations of respecting professional boundaries and the law within everyday practice with case examples for discussion. 

Objectives:

1. List three variables that contribute to the development of one's professional ethics. 

2. Explain the 4 stage ethical decision making process when presented with common practice scenarios.

3. Identify your stress cycle in the delivery of clinical care and three strategies to manage your vulnerabilities. 

 

10:00a.m. - 10:15a.m.  Networking Break / Sponsor Presentations

10:15a.m.- 11:45a.m.  Continued - Dr. Philip Hemphill, LCSW "Clinical Decisions through the Ethical  Lens"

 

11:45a.m.- 1:30p.m.   Lunch /  Tom Terrell Phd. Video / Sponsor Presentations

1:30p.m.  3:00p.m.    Marian McGavran, LCSW, BACS, CEDS-S - "Starting from Scratch; A Recipe for Disaster-Remixed for Recovery"

Learning Objectives:

1. Presenter will provide a summary of primary Eating Disorders diagnoses, Levels of Care within treatment and composition of the Interdisciplinary approach. 

2. Presenter will provide some historical background of identification of the illness and how far treatment has evolved. 

 3. Presenter will elaborate on statistics provided as set forth by ANAD for subsets of persons affected.

4. We will examine various Risk Factors for the illness.

5. We will explore some of the more commonly found functions for Eating Disorder behaviors and several approaches for intervention. 

 

3:00p.m. - 3:15pm    Networking Break / Sponsor Presentations

3:15pm - 4:45pm      Jamie Jones, M.Ed, NCC, LPC-S " Finding A Voice: Establishing Resiliency in Transgender Survivors of Trauma

Learning Objectives: 

1. List three care affirming treatment modalities that support treating transgender clients. 

 2. List two types of trauma a transgender client may experience. 

3. List two ways that an individual may have to transition. 

 

Tom Terrell Memorial Service Following Conference Close.

2020

Terrell Conference for Mental Health Practitioners 2020
Thursday, January 9th, and Friday, January 10th

Program Agenda

Thursday, January 9, 2019
 7:30 am - 8:30 am  Registration and Light Breakfast-- Sponsored by University Counseling Center
 8:30 am - 10:00 am Workshop Sessions (1.5 CE hours)

Session 1A (Workshop Part 1)
Brandy Klingman, LCSW-BACS-Resistance versus Noncompliance in Treatment

(Student Union Theater) (General)

Many clinicians experience the resistance or non-compliant patient either in private practice or in an agency setting. This can be a very challenging experience for both the therapist and the patient and can often results in an unnecessary termination of the relationship or treatment. The goal of this session is to create awareness and interventions for the resistant or non-compliant patient and to explore the root causes and differences between the two types of patients.

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Defining resistance and noncompliance and the difference between the two.

     2. Identifying potential behaviors associated with both resistance and noncompliance           and potential reasons/causation of these behaviors.

     3. Reflecting on clinicians countertransference when working with the patient.

    4. Identifying and reviewing potential application of clinical/psychotherapeutic
    intervention for these behaviors to create movement for the struggling patient.


    5. Review literature that supports interventions and defines reasons for resistance and         noncompliance.

About Brandy Klingman, LCSW-BACS
Brandy Klingman, LCSW-BACS is the CEO of St Christopher's Addiction Wellness, CEO of Legacy Behavioral Health and CEO of Life Works. Brandy Klingman is a certified Family and Civil Mediator and an active presenter and member of the American Group Psychotherapy as well as Louisiana Group Psychotherapy. She is trained in: ACT, DBT, CBT, EMDR, Harm Reduction, Systems Centered and is an Interventionist.

Session 1B
Presented by June M. Williams, PhD, LPC-S, Kirsten Dantin,
SELU M.S. Counseling Student, & Jane Troescher, SELU M.S. Counseling Student-Advocating for Trauma-Informed Practice and Policies

(Student Union Annex-Room 2202) (General)

“Trauma-informed care” is a concept that is familiar to most counselors; however, how familiar are we with some of the specific guidelines and principles that define trauma-informed organizations? This presentation will provide an overview of guidelines for creating trauma-informed systems, present examples of trauma-informed organizational principles, and share ideas for advocating for trauma-informed policies and practices within counseling agencies and organizations.

    Learning Objectives: 
    1. Participants will learn guidelines and principles that are characteristic of trauma-                informed organizations.

    2. Participants will recognize and identify examples of trauma-informed organizational
    practice.

    3. Participants will identify barriers to instituting trauma-informed care policies and                practices.

    4. Participants will identify specific ways in which they may advocate for trauma-informed       care policies and practices within the organizations in which they work, thus directly and       positively affecting client care.

About June M. Williams, PhD, LPC-S
June M. Williams is an associate professor of counseling at Southeastern Louisiana University and has taught in the program since 1995. She has served in leadership positions at the state and national level and frequently presents at state and national conferences. The primary presenter is an experienced clinician and counselor educator who teaches a course in which trauma is a major component and also provides supervision and teaches clinical courses in which students are working with clients who have experienced trauma. Over her almost 30 years in practice she has attended numerous workshops and trainings on trauma and has independently researched and read on the topic.

About Kirsten Dantin, Counseling Graduate Student

Advanced-level master’s student, with a specific interest in working with trauma and have taken a required course in which trauma is a major component. Kirsten is am executive board member LACGS (Louisiana Association of Counselor Graduate Students) and a Member of both ACA and LCA. Kirsten completed her practicum at the University Counseling Center. Kirsten finished her internship at Ascension Counseling Center and Metonria Manor (an IP facility for adolescent femail victims of sex trafficking).

About Jane Troescher, Counseling Graduate Student

Advanced-level master’s student, with a specific interest in working with trauma and have taken a required course in which trauma is a major component. She is completing her internship in Southeastern’s Counseling Program at the University Counseling Center.


Session 1C (Ethics)
Philip Hemphill, PhD, LCSW-Professional Boundaries and Ethics in the Digital Era

(Student Union Annex- Room 2207) (Ethics)
Presented by 
This workshop will explore professionalism in both personal and virtual relationships while reinforcing standards of care. Through didactic and interacting in small group discussions on self-care, boundaries and professionalism you will learn effective tools and processes for managing relationships and distressing life events.

    Learning Objectives:
    1.The attendees will describe different boundaries, perspectives, and goals for                       understanding the etiology of stress and its impact.

    2.The attendees will analyze their current levels of stress and generate opportunities to        make changes to enhance health and wellness.

    3.The attendees will apply their code of ethics to case scenarios while deploying                    techniques in the delivery of mental health care.

    4. The attendees will integrate the digital expectations of our culture into professionalism.


About Philip Hemphill, PhD, LCSW

Dr. Hemphill is a clinician, educator, and leader who has developed premier national programs for the evaluation, treatment, and monitoring of individuals with behavioral health and addictive disorders throughout his 26 year career. He’s co-authored a book in 2013 entitled Taming Disruptive Behavior published by American College of Physician Executives and is currently authoring a second book on Coordinated Care in Addiction Treatment (2020). Currently, he is a Professor of Practice at Tulane University and assistant clinical faculty at LSUHSC Department of Psychiatry where he has taught for the past 20 years. He’s a graduate of SELU
and Tulane University.


        10:00 am-10:15 am        Networking Break
        10:15 am-11:45 am        Workshop Sessions ( 1.5 CE Hours)


Session 2A (Workshop Part 2)

Brandy Klingman, LCSW-BACS - Continued
Resistance versus Noncompliance in Treatment

(Student Union Theater) (General)

Many clinicians experience the resistance or non-compliant patient either in private practice or in an agency setting. This can be a very challenging experience for both the therapist and the patient and can often results in an unnecessary termination of the relationship or treatment. The goal of this session is to create awareness and interventions for the resistant or non-compliant patient and to explore the root causes and differences between the two types of patients.

    Learning Objectives: 
    1. Defining resistance and noncompliance and the difference between the two.

    2. Identifying potential behaviors associated with both resistance and noncompliance            and potential reasons/causation of these behaviors. 

    3. Reflecting on clinicians countertransference when working with the patient.

    4. Identifying and reviewing potential application of clinical/psychotherapeutic
    intervention for these behaviors to create movement for the
    struggling patient.

    5. Review literature that supports interventions and defines reasons for resistance and          noncompliance.

About Brandy Klingman, LCSW-BACS
Brandy Klingman, LCSW-BACS is the CEO of St Christopher's Addiction Wellness, CEO of Legacy Behavioral Health and CEO of Life Works. Brandy Klingman is a certified Family and Civil Mediator and an active presenter and member of the American Group Psychotherapy as well as Louisiana Group Psychotherapy. She is trained in: ACT, DBT, CBT, EMDR, Harm Reduction, Systems Centered and is an Interventionist.

Session 2B (Diagnosis)
Michael Leeman, PhD, LPC, June Williams, PhD, LPC-S, and Reshelle Marino, PhD, LPC-S - Beyond Diagnosis: Viewing SUD through a Grief and Loss Lens

(Student Union Annex- Room 2207) (Diagnosis-Clinical)

The focus of this presentation is treating SUD disorder from a broad lens by integrating knowledge and understanding of how loss and grief interact with SUD. Through the use of a case study, the presenters will demonstrate how loss and grief issues can easily be overlooked in the treatment of SUD and provide guidance as to how these issues can be addressed during treatment.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Recognize the limitations in viewing SUD from a diagnostic perspective.

    2. Explain the identity clients form with the addictive substances.

    3. Identify how issues of loss and subsequent grieving (both prior to the addiction and           during).

    4. Implement strategies and interventions that help clients recognize and address their          loss through healthy ways of grieving.


About Michael Leeman PhD, LPC
Dr. Leeman is a Licensed Professional Counselor with approximately 6 years of clinical practice working with clients with a variety of mental health issues including substance use, trauma, and loss. For the past 5 years, he has taught on topics such as trauma, grief, and substance use in higher education and supervised interns in various clinical settings. His research interests include interpersonal trauma, early childhood trauma, and posttraumatic growth.
About June M. Williams, Ph.D., LPC-S
June M. Williams is an associate professor of counseling at Southeastern Louisiana University and has taught in the program since 1995. She has served in leadership positions at the state and national level and frequently presents at state and national conferences. Dr. Williams has presented at national conferences on grief and loss. She has developed course curriculum on different forms of grief and her research interests include gratitude, resilience, and grief and loss.
About Reshelle Marino, PhD, LPC-S
Dr. Marino has taught on topics such as trauma, grief, and substance use and supervised interns in various clinical settings. Her research interests include human trafficking and prevention, supervision, advocacy and social justice.

Session 2C


Jantrell Johnson, LPC, NCC-Substance Abuse Counselors Professional Quality of Life and the Counselor Client Relationship

(Student Union Annex- Room 2203) (General)

The shortage of substance abuse counselors has reached catastrophic levels (National Association of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Counselors [NAADAC], 2018). Possible reasons for the deficiency of substance abuse counselors can be credited to the onset of baby boomers retiring, turnover rates, lack of new professionals seeking out a career in substance abuse counseling, and the incumbent spike in the need for substance abuse treatment. Professional quality of life typically suffers due to the demands of the job, large caseloads and exposure to traumatic events (Perkins, & Sprang, 2013). Researchers typically explore turnover but never the burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion satisfaction tied to substance abuse counseling. It is important to further examine the factors associated with burnout, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion satisfaction with regard to substance abuse counselors and the counselor-client relationship. Addiction counseling is becoming very popular in politics due to the recent legalization of marijuana in some states and the opioid epidemic. In an effort to provide reform and treatment options opposed to imprisonment, the legal system has sought out the help of chemical dependency treatment centers. Addiction is viewed as a disease of the brain and not the moral conviction of the addicted person and I believe that this holds true in the current predicament of society. Substance abuse counselors are expected to have specific
training in substance abuse courses. CACREP accredited clinical mental health counseling graduate programs offer one course specific to addiction counseling, and addiction counseling graduate programs offer 60-semester hours focused on models of treatment, prevention, recovery, and relapse prevention. Although there are courses that are specific to addiction counseling, there is a lack of education provided to substance abuse counselors about burnout and secondary traumatic stress and its impact on the counselor- client relationship.

About Jantrell Johnson, LPC, NCC
Jantrell Johnson, LPC, NCC, holds a Master of Arts degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Southern University and A&M College. Jantrell is currently employed at Woodlake Addiction Recovery Center where she serves as an intensive outpatient counselor. Jantrell views herself as a change agent in the fields of mental health and substance abuse. Jantrell is currently pursuing her PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision at The University of Holy Cross in New Orleans, LA.

        11:45 am - 1:00 pm        Lunch and Expo (Lunch or on your own)
        1:15 pm - 1:30 pm         Conference Welcome
        1:30 pm - 3:00 pm         Keynote Session 3A (1.5 CE Hours)

 

James S. Flowers, Phd., LPC-S -Take the Guesswork Out of Comprehensive Healthcare: Importance of Diagnostic Evaluations in Pain Recovery, Complex Medical Cases, and Treatment Resistant Clients

(Student Union Theater) (Diagnosis-Clinical)

Comprehensive Diagnostics Evaluations gather 360 degrees of information about an individual strengths and challenges in all areas of their life, resulting in what can be called a living MRI. Addiction, mental health, chronic pain and other complex medical issues blanket our society. Many questions go unanswered from hasty or uninformed decisions for treatments, therapies and healthcare, which often results in miss-diagnosis and untreated symptoms of the individual. Comprehensive diagnostic evaluations provide multidisciplinary in-depth testing in order to pinpoint the problem. The results of a Comprehensive Diagnostic Evaluations provide solutions for the best diagnostic criteria, treatment planning and treatment options to provide the client or loved one the best opportunity for living the best life possible.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. The participant will gain an understanding of comprehensive diagnostic evaluations for       pain and addiction, mental illness and overall health.

    2. The participant will be able to discuss five components of comprehensive diagnostic           evaluations to help get to the root of the identified patient’s concern or behavior.

    3. The participant will be able to identify three types of clients that would benefit from            comprehensive diagnostic evaluations.

About James S. Flowers, Phd., LPC-S
For more than 25 years, Dr. Flowers has been one of the most familiar and respected names in the area of pain recovery, chronic pain, and addiction. A leader in the field, his history in evaluation and treatment of chronic pain and co-occurring addiction has led to an exceptionally distinguished career. With fellowship training in behavioral pain management, Dr. Flowers completed clinical rotations at The University of Washington, The Rosomoff Comprehensive Center for Pain, The University of Miami, and The Mayo Clinic. Dr. Flowers has developed and built many of the nation’s leading pain and addiction recovery programs within some of the most respected healthcare and addiction treatment centers in the country. He has successfully guided teams through assessment, treatment planning, and course of treatment. As an entrepreneur, he has been a founding partner of renowned upscale treatment programs throughout the state of Texas. Dr. Flowers has dedicated his career to his passion --designing multidisciplinary addiction treatment programs and clinical protocols to help individuals suffering from addiction and chronic pain. With a demonstrated commitment to healthcare, human healing, and healthcare organizations that create positive change in the lives of people, he has been dedicated to all who have been involved with and treated in those programs. Over the years, his passion and dedication to clients as well as his unique approach have earned him an exceptional reputation as one of the nation’s premier experts. He is a popular public speaker and lecturer to audiences across the United States and abroad. Dr. Flowers is a lifelong distance runner with more than 28 marathons to his credit. He has competed in several ultra- marathons, including 70- and 100-mile trail and mountain races. In addition, Dr. Flowers is a pilot.

        3:00 pm - 3:15 pm        Networking Break
        3:15 pm - 4:15 pm        Session 4A (1 CE hours)

Madison Evans, LPC, and Annette Baldwin, LPC, LMFT-What’s up with LION UP Collegiate Recovery


(Student Union Theater) (General)

Although Collegiate Recovery is not new to the nation, it is to Louisiana. LION UP Recovery has been established to help those students who identify as being in recovery. Through the efforts of the University Counseling Center under Department of Student Affairs, staff trained with substance use disorders and recovery has put together a CRP (Collegiate Recovery Program). A CRP is a program which offers specialized and strategic support to help students achieve growth and success in their recovery and academic journey.

 

    Learning Objectives:

    1. How are Collegiate Recovery Programs beneficial for extending quality recovery while       engaged with higher education,

    2. Collegiate recovery programs are not designed as treatment programs; they are                 designed to offer extended recovery support on college campuses so your student has         a safe harbor and a community of like minded others to be with

    3. how collegiate recovery programs fight stigma associated with substance mis-use and

    4. how CRPs engage Allies in Recovery opening access to treatment.

About Annette Baldwin M.A., LPC, LMFT
Annette Newton-Baldwin is the Assistant Director of Programming and Outreach as well as a full-time counselor at the University Counseling Center. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor as well as a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. Annette is a native of Slidell, Louisiana. In 1997, she earned a Master of Arts in Counseling from the University of Louisiana at Monroe. She has a special interest in substance abuse recovery counseling as well as working with trauma. Annette current serves on the TRACC AOD Prevention coalition and with Junior Auxiliary of Hammond. Annette is ARISE Trained with Arise Continuing Care with Intervention and is currently working with LION UP Collegiate Recovery Programming.


About Madison Evans M.S., LPC
Madison Allen Evans is staffed in the University Counseling Center as Coordinator of Southeastern Louisiana University LION UP Collegiate Recovery Program. She graduated from Southeastern in 2015 with a BA in Psychology and a minor in French. She then went on to complete her Master's degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling at Southeastern in 2017. Madison is a Licensed Professional Counselor and a Nationally Certified Counselor. After spending two years as Interim Coordinator of the Office of Student Accessibility Services, she moved into her position working with students in recovery from substance use disorder and other addictive behaviors. Madison focuses on the University's diversity and accessibility for all students and is passionate about inclusion for students as they move their collegiate careers at Southeastern.

        4:30 pm - 5:30 pm        Tour of Collegiate Recovery at Recovery Room

        (Door prizes and reception--Sponsored by Acadia Behavioral )

        6:30 pm -7:30 pm        LION UP CRP Collegiate Recovery Board Meeting (Board                                                       Members Only)

Friday - January 10th, 2020


        7:30am - 8:30am        Registration (Breakfast)
        8:30am - 10am           Breakout Sessions (1.5 CE Hours)
Session 5A (Supervision)

Angela Wood, Ph.D., LCSW-BACS, CCS-Motivational Interviewing Strategies in Clinical Supervision


(Student Union Annex- Room 2207) (Supervision)

Motivational Interviewing is an evidence-based approach that facilitates therapeutic rapport, engagement, and uses strategic counseling skills to resolve ambivalence and strengthen internal commitment for change. This approach will be applied within the context of the supervisory relationship.

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Participants will define Motivational Interviewing (MI) and its application to the                     supervisory relationship.

    2. Will be able to apply the spirit and principles of MI to the supervisory relationship.

    3. Be able to explain the four processes of MI within the context of supervision.

    4. Identify MI strategies that can be applied in supervision.

About Angela Wood, Ph.D., LCSW-BACS, CCS
Dr. Angie Wood has worked in the social work field for nearly 28 years. She is a member of the Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers, and is an instructor with Southeastern's social work program. Dr. Wood has conducted motivational interviewing workshops since 2005, and brings her varied clinical experiences in her presentation style.


Session 5B


Jessica Gibson Kendrick, LPC, LLC Owner/Therapist/Interventionist -Families Affected by Addiction: How can the Helpers help?

(Student Union Annex- Room 2203) (General)

Whether we choose to work directly with addiction in our practices or not, mental health professionals encounter the effects of addiction regularly. How can we open the door to this conversation with those caring for someone misusing or abusing substances? This session will help mental health professionals explore relationships effected by addiction and create realistic
expectations for family recovery.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify signs of substance misuse/abuse and chemical dependency.

    2. Describe the role of families in addiction recovery

    3. Describe codependency, enabling, and detachment Identify appropriate interventions        and supports for family members of individuals struggling with substances and when an        intervention is necessary.
   4. Explore related professional ethics

About Jessica Gibson Kendrick, LPC, LLC
Jessica Gibson Kendrick, LPC, operates a private practice in Lafayette, LA, specializing in treating families affected by addiction through family coaching, education, therapy, and intervention. Jessica regularly hosts on-line and in-person workshops on codependency, family roles, and boundaries in addiction. She facilitates the weekly Family Care Group at Victory Addiction Recovery Center providing support and education for families affected by the disease of addiction. Jessica is also an experienced yoga teacher and self-care enthusiast.


Session 5C (Diagnosis)


Crystal Hooper, LPC, NCC, School Counselor-Using CBT with an Anxiety Diagnosis in children/adolescents


(Student Union Theater) (Diagnosis-Clinical)

 

Anxiety, anxiety, anxiety from parents to children, everyone incorporates their anxiety levels in a conversation about themselves. What if people begin to express lowering their levels of
anxiety by changing the way they perceive themselves and the world around them. When children/adolescents begin to think differently they develop a positive view and create healthy self images of themselves.

Learning Objectives:

1. Recognizing the various symptoms/signs of anxiety in children/adolescence
and how to implement treatment.

2. To reduce episodes of anxiety by building tolerance for situations that cause anxious feelings and daily struggles.

3. Identifying healthy and unhealthy forms of anxiety caused by school triggers. 4. Identifying challenging and negative self talk and replacing it with positive self talk.


About Crystal Hooper, LPC, NCC, School Counselor
Crystal Hooper is a School counselor of five years, she is familiar with working with children of all ages. I have worked within the court systems specifically juvenile and drug court. I have been a trained MST therapist, focusing on family and family systems utilizing solution focused therapy. I also volunteer assisting a pastoral care team. I am a trained Christian Counselor. I am married 14 years and I have 4 children. I am also a military wife. I have a private practice, Crystal Clear Counseling located in Hammond and Covington.

        10:00-10:15 am        Networking Break
        10:15am-11:45am    Breakout session (1.5 CE Hours)

Session 6A (Diagnosis)


Tanya Stuart, LCSW-BACS,LAC, CCS-Diagnosing Co-Occurring Clients

(Student Union Annex- Room 2207) (Diagnosis-Clinical)

According to a 2014 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 7.9 million people in the U.S. experience both a mental disorder and substance use disorder simultaneously. More than
half of those people—4.1 million to be exact—are men. It is important for providers to be competent in treating individuals with co-occurring diagnosis. This workshop is designed to give the audience a basic understanding of co-occurring diagnosis , how to identify the appropriate levels of care and barriers to treatment.
Learning Objectives:

1. Identifying substance use disorder and co-occurring clients

2. Gaining a better understanding of integrated treatment

3. Processing personal feelings and thoughts toward substance abuse

4. Levels of treatment for substance abuse and barriers to treatment for individuals


About Tanya Stuart, LCSW-BACS, LAC, CCS
Tanya Stuart is an accomplished known mental health and substance abuse professional. She began her journey working with troubled adolescents in the criminal justice system. That began a lifelong search to give children, adolescents, and adults comprehensive and individualized mental health and substance abuse care. She obtained her MSW from SUNO in 2002. She is the owner of Tanya Stuart, Inc and Owner of Genesis Behavioral Health Services, LLC. Tanya provides supervision for psychiatric residents for Our Lady of the Lake, serves as a liaison for LSU master level students. Tanya utilizes various modalities in treatment including Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), Supportive Therapy, Motivational Interviewing and “Accountability Therapy” to assist and guide clients in reaching their full potential. Her philosophy can be summed up as, “for individuals to reach happiness and contentment in life, everyone must find a balance in mind, body, and spirit.”

Session 6B


Lori Wagner, LPC, NCC and Clarissa Sampey, M.Ed, SLU, STC-CoordinatorTrauma...The Body/Brain Connection

(Student Union Annex- Room 2203) (General)


We now have deeper insights into the nature of trauma that simply didn’t exist, even a short time ago. Researchers studying trauma can now show what actually happens – in the brain and in our nervous system – during and after a traumatic event. Understanding the role of the brain and nervous system can bring depth and power to our interventions. We will examine the research, connections and ACE (Adverse Childhood Experience) Study to examine the effects and results of trauma across the lifespan.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify the 3 major networks of the brain associated with trauma.

    2. Gain knowledge of the research surrounding trauma and the body.

    3. Connect the body and mind.
    4. Understand the effects of trauma within the body.


About Lori Wagner, LPC, NCC
23 Years of experience in the Social Service Field. Earned Bachelor's degree in Criminal Justice 1994 (SLU). Earned a Master's in Counseling in 2004 (SLU), became licensed as an LPC in 2008, 8 years in private practice, 8 years as a Parenting Educator, 4 Years in Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment, 2 years as a Family Therapist, 10 years in Juvenile Justice as an LPC, 3 years as Compliance officer in Mental Health.


About Clarissa Sampey, M.Ed, SLU, STC Coordinator
Masters in Counseling Graduate of Southeastern Louisiana University.


Session 6C


Pamela J. Parsons, MD-Cynicism: Coping Gone Rogue

(Student Union Theater) (General)

Cynicism develops early in life, and can be a healthy strategy for assessing trust and boundaries. However, as we move through our educational years, including, our professional training, cynicism can affect our wellness as providers, and can contribute greatly to provider burnout. We owe it to ourselves as mental health professionals, and more importantly as human beings, to address cynicism in order to be as compassionate and functional as possible. This educational activity is designed to give several touchpoints of action that providers can use in their personal and professional lives.

    Learning objectives:

    1. Describe origins of cynicism

    2. Assess relationship of cynicism to burnout

    3. Drill in to deeper understanding of cynicism

    4. Choose 3 touchpoints of action

About Pamela J. Parson, MD
Pamela J. Parsons, MD is a psychiatrist with almost 30 years of experience working inpatient, outpatient (private and state sectors), and since 2012 owning her private practice. While she obtained her medical degree and specialty training in South Carolina, she is a Louisianan by choice. Dr. Parsons' special interests professionally include taking care of fellow caregivers, as we are all in this noble profession together.


        11:45am-1:30pm  Lunch/Networking and Terrell Award Presentation  Student Union                                           Ballroom
                  

        1:30pm - 3:00pm Breakout sessions (1.5 CE Hours)


Session 7A (Supervision)


Michael S. Leeman, Ph.D., LPC, Laura Squires, SELU Masters Counseling Student, and Kirsten Dantin, SELU Counseling Masters Student- Ethical Practices in Supervision and the Importance of the Supervisory Relationship (Part 1)


(Student Union Theater) (Supervision)


Suspecting, perceiving, or witnessing supervisor non-adherence to ethical practices can cause supervisees to become disillusioned, ambivalent, and distressed when determining how to proceed responsibly. When do supervisees report an ethical violation? How
do supervisees address an ethical violation? What will happen after supervisees report? What are the possible implications, consequences, and outcomes of a report? In this presentation, we will review state laws and the ACA Code of Ethics, as well as other pertinent principles and policies to demonstrate how best to establish and maintain an ethical and effective supervisory relationship. Also, we will review case studies to illustrate the importance of the supervisory relationship and how supervisees can preempt and address concerns about supervisor non-adherence to ethical practices.

    Learning Objectives:

 

    1. Identify the core relational factors of the supervisory relationship,

    2. Explain how to establish and sustain an effective supervisory relationship,
    3. Describe the significance of the supervisory relationship in the supervision process,

    4. Conduct an effective interview of prospective supervisors to determine goodness of fit,

    5. Apply pertinent laws, ethics, and policies to case studies to address ethical dilemmas        in supervision.


About Michael S. Leeman, Ph.D., LPC
Dr. Michael S. Leeman is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Southeastern Louisiana University. He has presented statewide and nationally on various topics including ethics and supervision, psychological trauma and posttraumatic growth, play therapy and
filial therapy, and motivational interviewing. His research interests include the effects of psychological trauma and posttraumatic growth. Dr. Leeman is a Licensed Professional Counselor and has clinical experience in private practice, community clinics, and
school settings. He has provided clinical counseling for both children and adults struggling with trauma related issues.


About Laura Squires, Graduate Student with Southeastern Louisiana University
Laura Squires Meza is currently a graduate student at Southeastern Louisiana University. She is concentrating on Marriage, Family, and Couples counseling. Laura received her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Southeastern Louisiana University in 2005 and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Louisiana State University in 2011. She is completing her internship at both Southeastern Louisiana University Counseling Center and Northshore Family Counseling. Laura is a current member of the American Counseling Association, Louisiana Counseling Association, and Chi Sigma Iota.


About Kirsten Dantin, Graduate Student with Southeastern Louisiana University


Advanced-level master’s student, with a specific interest in working with trauma and have taken a required course in which trauma is a major component. She is completing her internship in Southeastern’s Counseling Program. Kirsten is a member of ACA, Chi Sigma Iota and LACGS (Louisiana Association of Counselor Graduate Students).

 

 

Session 7B

Adrienne Naquin-Bolton, LPC-S, NCC and Krystyn K. Dupree, PLPC, Counselor I Am the 1 in 4: Bringing the Conversation of Pregnancy Loss out of the Shadows

 (Student Union Annex- Room 2203) (General)

This session is designed to help mental health professionals work with those that have experienced pregnancy loss. This is a loss that can often go overlooked, as this loss is often invalidated by family, friends, medical professionals, and society. By the end of
this session, professionals will have a better understanding of what pregnancy loss is and how to better help those that have experienced it.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. To educate about the different types of pregnancy loss.

    2. Raise awareness about the prevalence of pregnancy loss and what not to say to those          grieving a loss.

    3. Discuss the different aspects of the unique grieving and mourning processes inherent          with pregnancy loss.

    4. Identify the counseling techniques that can be beneficial to working with clients.


About Adrienne Naquin-Bolton, LPC-S, NCC
Adrienne Naquin-Bolton is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in the state of Louisiana and is a National Certified Counselor (NCC). Adrienne is a 2006 graduate of Nicholls State University and a 2008 graduate of the University of New Orleans where she received her Master's degree in Counselor Education. Adrienne currently serves as Director of Student Support Services at Nicholls State University. She has a decade of counseling experience helping to empower survivors of domestic and sexual abuse as well as women experiencing crisis pregnancy and pregnancy loss.

About Krystyn K. Dupree, PLPC, Counselor

Krystyn K. Dupree is a graduate of Northwestern State University of Louisiana. Mrs. Dupree worked as a counselor intern at Northwestern's Counseling Center and was hired at Nicholls State University as a Counselor after graduation in December 2017. She has been trained as QPR Gatekeep Instructor for Suicide Prevention. Mrs. Dupree is currently pursuing her PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision at the University of New Orleans.

Session 7C (General CE)


Paula Norris Mestayer, M.Ed., LPC, FAPA-NAD, A New Treatment Paradigm

(Student Union Annex- Room 2202) (General)

NAD (Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide) is an essential molecule found in every cell of your body. It is a coenzyme of Vitamin B3 (niacin), which means it’s a small helper molecule that binds to a protein molecule to activate an enzyme. Enzymes are responsible for over 5,000 different biochemical reactions throughout the body and NAD+ participates in more reactions than any other vitamin-derived molecule. NAD+ is needed for metabolic functions to take place in all the cells in your body, including your brain. Science now illustrates that deficient NAD is a neurological consequence of addiction and can be ameliorated. NAD infusion, coupled with compassionate patient care, can release patients from the grips of addiction.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Participants will learn about Nicotinomide Adenine Dinucleotide: A game changer in           the field of addiction

    2. Participants will learn the difference between Nutritional Detox vs. Medicinal Detox

    3. Why Providing Compassionate Care is important

    4. About Healing the Walking Wounded with NAD

 

About Paula Norris Mestayer, M.Ed., LPC, FAPA
Since 1979, when she completed her graduate degree in Mental Health Counseling at Tulane University Medical School and her clinical internship at the Manhattan Children’s Psychiatric Center, Ms. Norris has devoted her professional life to helping patients deal effectively with a wide variety of sub-acute psycho-physiological conditions, including PTSD, panic and anxiety attacks, chronic and acute stress, affective and character disorders, alcohol and substance abuse problems, and marital and family challenges. The success of this treatment modality led to the founding of Springfield Wellness, in operation since 2001.

Session 7D


Garry Eldridge, M.Div., LMFT, LPC-S, CSAT, CMAT, CPTT, EFT Therapist-Sexual Addiction: Is This Really a Thing, or Just Fake News?

(Student Union Annex- Room 2207) (Diagnosis-Clinical)


While Sexual Addiction or Compulsive Sexual Disorder are not currently in the DSM-V, many persons and relationships suffer from the destructive consequences of this phenomenon. This workshop will show how the widely accepted Addiction Criteria used to identify substance addiction & other process addictions, like Gambling Addiction, are applicable to Sexual Addiction. The 13 Types of Sexual Addiction will be discussed, and the most effective screening & treatment protocol explained.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Understand the addiction criteria as it applies to sexual addiction/compulsive behavior.

    2. Understand the collateral indicators applicable to sexual addiction.

    3. Become familiar with the Sexual Addiction Screening Test-Revised

    4. Understand the basic treatment protocol for effective recovery from sexual                            addiction/compulsive sexual behavior.

About Garry Eldridge, M.Div., LMFT, LPC-S, CSAT, CMAT,CPTT, EFT Therapist
Garry knows how to help people who are at the end of their rope with the negative consequences of addictive sexual behavior. He knows to how to help the partners & loved ones who are traumatized and adversely affected by the destructive sexual behavior of the sex addict. He has trained extensively with Patrick Carnes, PhD, who is widely viewed as the pioneer in the ground-breaking work in identifying & treating sexual addiction. Garry is certified as a Certified Sexual Addiction Therapist, Certified Multiple Addiction Therapist, & a Certified Partner Trauma Therapist through IITAP, the International Institute of Trauma & Addiction Professionals. Garry's professional practice is with Lighthouse Counseling Center in Mandeville, New Orleans, & Baton Rouge.

        3:00pm-3:15pm         Networking Break
        3:15pm-4:45pm         Break out session (1.5 CE Hours)

Session 8A


Michael S. Leeman, Ph.D., with LPC, Laura Squires, SELU masters Counseling Student, and Kirsten Dantin, SELU Masters Counseling Student-Ethical Practices in Supervision and the Importance of the Supervisory Relationship (Part 2)

(Student Union Theater) (Supervision)

 

Suspecting, perceiving, or witnessing supervisor non-adherence to ethical practices can cause supervisees to become disillusioned, ambivalent, and distressed when determining how to proceed responsibly. When do supervisees report an ethical violation? How do supervisees address an ethical violation? What will happen after supervisees report? What are the possible implications, consequences, and outcomes of a report? In this presentation, we will review state laws and the ACA Code of Ethics, as well as other pertinent principles and policies to demonstrate how best to establish and maintain an ethical and effective supervisory relationship. Also, we will review case studies to illustrate the importance of the supervisory relationship and how supervisees can preempt and address concerns about supervisor non-adherence to ethical practices.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Identify the core relational factors of the supervisory relationship,

    2. Explain how to establish and sustain an effective supervisory relationship,

    3. Describe the significance of the supervisory relationship in the supervision process,

    4. Conduct an effective interview of prospective supervisors to determine goodness of fit,
    5. Apply pertinent laws, ethics, and policies to case studies to address ethical dilemmas        in supervision.

About Michael S. Leeman, Ph.D., LPC
Dr. Michael S. Leeman is an Assistant Professor of Counseling at Southeastern Louisiana University. He has presented statewide and nationally on various topics including ethics and
supervision, psychological trauma and posttraumatic growth, play therapy and filial therapy, and motivational interviewing. His research interests include the effects of psychological trauma and posttraumatic growth. Dr. Leeman is a Licensed Professional Counselor and has clinical experience in private practice, community clinics, and school settings. He has provided clinical counseling for both children and adults struggling with trauma related issues.

About Laura Meza, Graduate Student with Southeastern Louisiana University
Laura Squires Meza is currently a graduate student at Southeastern Louisiana University. She is concentrating on Marriage, Family, and Couples counseling. Laura received her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Southeastern Louisiana University in 2005 and a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering from Louisiana State University in 2011. She is completing her internship at both Southeastern Louisiana University Counseling Center and Northshore Family Counseling. Laura is a current member of the American Counseling Association, Louisiana Counseling
Association, and Chi Sigma Iota.

About Kirsten Dantin, Graduate Student with Southeastern Louisiana University

Kirsten Dantin is an Advanced-level master’s student, with a specific interest in
working with trauma and have taken a required course in which trauma is a major component. She is completing her internship in Southeastern’s Counseling Program. Kirsten is a member of ACA, Chi Sigma Iota and LACGS (Louisiana Association of Counselor Graduate Students).

Session 8B

Kyle Aaron, M.Ed, LPC, NCC-What role does the Placebo Effect play in therapy

(Student Union Annex- Room 2203) (General)

The Role of the Placebo Effect in Therapy: An examination of the factors that contribute to successful psychotherapy and how to harness soft metaskills that help shape healing experience.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Gain an understanding of factors that have been found to be essential to positive               therapeutic experience for client through meta-analysis and qualitative exploration.

    2. Review of studies on how successful psychotherapy is on the whole.

    3. Gain an understanding of history of placebo effec and various perspectives on it.

    4. Review of several case studies in which master therapists historically have harnessed      the Placebo effect in successful therapies.

    5. Discussion on how evidenced based therapies can harness some of the additional            factors found to be essential for a positive therapeutic experience.

About Kyle Arron, M.Ed, LPC, NCC
Kyle Aaron is an LPC who has worked primarily in a Residential Addiction and Dual Diagnosis Setting since graduating in 2013 from SELU. He employs an eclectic approach to therapy, utilizing techniques and concepts from Psychodrama, Analytic Psychology, Internal Family Systems and 12 step Wisdom. He has a particular interest in Joseph Campbell's Hero Journey and how to mobilize that journey in people who have found themselves to be stuck in their lives.


Session 8C


Robyn Sonnier LPC, NCC, CCTP-Embracing the Practice of Self Compassion

(Student Union Annex- Room 2202) (General)


This program will focus on the importance of self- compassion with personal focus and how to incorporate the practice with clients as well as highlighting the benefits of self-compassion work vs. self-esteem work and will provide various exercises to promote self-compassion.

    Learning Objectives:

    1.Learn about the 3 components of self-compassion.

    2.Gain understanding of the benefits of teaching self-compassion versus self-esteem.

    3.Learn about practices to promote self-compassion both for personal self and for clients.

    4. Leave with a general understanding of the self-compassion practice and how to                implement both personally and professionally.


About Robyn Sonnier LPC, NCC, CCTP
Robyn Sonnier is a Licensed Professional Counseling working in private practice in the Baton Rouge area. She has vast experience working with substance abuse and trauma and has worked in various clinical settings including residential treatment, partial hospitalization, intensive outpatient, and now private practice.

Session 8D


Emily Meyers, LPC and Patrick Hammett-Treating Addiction in the Family

(Student Union Annex- Room 2207) (Diagnosis-Clinical)

As clinicians, many of the families that we treat have experience with addiction in their family systems. During the treatment process, we need to be aware of the impact that living in
an addicted system can have on individuals and the intergenerational family patterns. In this session we will discuss assessment of the family dynamics including the symptoms displayed development of treatment plans for the family and strategies for treatment.

    Learning Objectives:
    1. Brief overview of family systems theory,

    2. Learn patterns of addiction in the family to assess and diagnose addiction,                        codependency, etc,

    3. Developing treatment plans for addicted systems

    4. Strategies for treating addicted systems

About Emily Meyers, LPC
Emily Meyers is a Licensed Professional Counselor and currently serves as the Clinical Director for all of the Longbranch Healthcare programs. A Wisconsin native, she attended the University of Wisconsin-Stout where she received a Bachelor's degree in Psychology with minors in Human Development and Family Studies and Human Resource Management. After completing her undergraduate degree, Emily moved to South Louisiana where she attended Southeastern Louisiana University. Much of Emily’s experience has been assisting families recover from the devastating effects of addiction on the family unit. Emily is energetic and passionate about improving care in the state of Louisiana and assisting clients and families who are suffering recover. In addition to clinical experience, Emily brings a warmth and compassion into her work with client’s and their families. Emily utilizes an eclectic approach to best fit each client’s needs and draws from family systems models, mindfulness, cognitive, and solution-oriented therapies.

About Patrick Hammett

Patrick  is a professional counselor with clinical experience in substance abuse counseling.  He currently works at Longbranch Recovery Center. He is a 2014 graduate of Southeastern Louisiana University.

2019

 

Thursday, January 10, 2019

4pm: Expo/Registration

  6pm - 8pm: Conference Welcome and Opening Speaker (1.5 CE hours)

Nick Hayes, M.S., LMFTA (TX), LCDC (TX) as Director of Clinical Research - Cumberland Heights - Recovery Science Research and Outcomes: Past, Present, and Future

The study of recovery phenomena is not new. Decades of research has provided indications that recovery frameworks positively impact individuals and their families. However, the proportion of individuals whom access and sustain recovery remains minimal. A part of what separates access to recovery frameworks includes poor measurement, constrained conceptual definitions, and the limited orientation of chronic care structures throughout health systems. Today, emerging bodies of research have begun to uncover compelling insights into our understanding of what treatments and interventions best support broad applications of recovery scaffolding. Some examples include the leveraging of data for clinical utility, the application of pharmacotherapy in treatment environments, and the adoption of recovery-oriented systems of care. Looking toward the future, where do we go from here? The following presentation will describe how current recovery science initiatives could impact the future of healthcare, how technology can assist with increasing recovery access throughout our communities and highlighting how we all can support emerging recovery science initiatives throughout our communities. 

Learning Objectives: 

1.  Presentation participants will review the historical body of research that supports recovery science.

2.  Presentation participants will evaluate the fundamental issues that challenge behavioral health scientists studying recovery phenomena.

3.  Presentation participants will assess new applications of recovery science into everyday clinical practice.

 

Friday, January 11, 2019

  7:30-8:30 am: Registration

  8:30 – 10:00 am: Breakout Sessions (1.5 CE hours)

1.  Angie Woods, Phd, LCSW, BACS- Motivational Interviewing Self-Assessment:             Kicking It Up a Notch

Presenter will first review the latest research on motivational interviewing and client language on outcomes. The Eight Stages of Learning Motivational Interviewing will be used as a guide to evaluating the participant's level of competence in the application of Motivational Interviewing in practice.

Learning Objectives

1.  To understand what makes motivational interviewing (MI) effective; and

2. To be able to identify strengths and areas for improvement in the participant's level of competence in applying the spirit of MI, core counseling skills (OARS), recognition of change talk, eliciting and strengthening change talk,softening sustain talk and discord, developing a change and consolidating commitment, and switching between MI and other approaches.

2.  Ryan Phillips LPC-S, NCC- Addiction and the Family System

Presentation defines and reviews addiction, contributing factors, personality disorder, codependency, and the family system.

Learning Objectives

1.  Educate on the effects of addiction on the family system and approaches to focus on when counseling the family.

  10:00-10:15 am                 Networking Break

  10:15-11:45 am                 Breakout Sessions (1.5 CE hours)

  1. Yevonne Baran, PhD, LPC-S, LMFT-S - Ethical Clinical Supervision - What the Experts Teach Us

Are you a clinical supervisor or supervisee who has heard conflicting messages from others about the ethics involved in supervision? Join us for an entertaining and informative critique of the new ACA published book titled, Gatekeeping in the Mental Health Professions edited by Homrich and Henderson. Brainstorm ethical options in dealing with clinical dilemmas for both supervisors and supervisees. Gain knowledge and support from experts and peers in the mental health field and leave this session with a renewed sense of appreciation for the ethical process in clinical supervision.

Learning Objectives

1.  Participants will be better informed about dual/multiple roles with clinical supervision and how to navigate them.

2.  Participants will increase their understanding of the complexities of ethical decision-making within the context of the supervisory relationship and improve their appreciation of their supervisor or supervisee’s approach in addressing these.

3.  Participants will learn specific techniques to establish ethical supervision parameters and ongoing evaluation.   

2.  Garry Eldridge, LMFT, LPC-S, CSAT, CMAT, EFT Therapist - “Sexual Addiction: Is it      Really a Thing, or just Fake News?”

This presentation addresses how sexual addiction characteristics match those of other   substance & process addictions, and provides a model for effective treatment. Sexual addiction when properly diagnosed is not an excuse for bad behavior, but a valid clinical determination that  provides a framework for helping and understanding the client's out of control, compulsive sexual behavior. It provides hope for many clients, partners, & families who have for so long felt hopeless.

Learning Objectives

1.  Understand how sexual addiction/compulsive sexual behavior is a valid clinical determination, even though it is currently not in the DSM-V.

2.  Ability to identify & determine the presence of sexual addiction

3.  Understand the addiction criteria as applicable to sexual addiction

4.  Understand the collateral indicators that are. markers for sexual addiction

5.  Introduce the Sexual Addiction Screening Test-Revised

6.  Identify the four Core Beliefs/Lies of the sexual addiction client

7.  How to provide effective treatment for clients suffering from sexual addiction"

3. Kenison Roy, III, MD - Use of Medication Maintenance in Abstinence Based Treatment for Addiction

There has been controversy about the use and usefulness of buprenorphine in "Abstinence Based" treatment and treatment programs. The goal of this presentation is to review the literature on the success of abstinence-based treatment for opioid addiction and the success of maintenance therapy with buprenorphine and then report successful treatment protocols that combine the modalities.

Learning Objectives

1.  Understand the usefulness of buprenorphine in abstinence-based treatment

2.  Understand the usefulness of abstinence-based treatment in patients maintained on buprenorphine

3.  Mediate controversies among advocates for partial agonist maintenance and advocates for abstinence-based treatment

  11:45 – 1:30 pm         Lunch and Learn(Award/Networking)

  1:30-3:00 pm              Breakout Sessions (1.5 CE hours)

1.  Deborah Allsbrook LPC-S and Kathy Lammert LPC-S - Embracing the 21st                    Century: Technology in Counselor Education and Supervision

More and more counselors, supervisors, and counselor educators are using technology as a part of their daily professional lives. There is a need for a greater understanding of how technology is being used in the training and supervision of counselors. Topics such as methods for online delivery of coursework, uses of technology in supervision, boundaries, confidentiality, ethical considerations, and gatekeeping concerns will be discussed. Participants will be encouraged to engage in a conversation about the role technology plays in the development of professional counselors.

Learning Objectives

1.  Learn the different types and uses of technology in supervision

2.  Learn about a platform for online delivery of counselor education

3.  Identify the pros and cons of using technology as part of both counselor education and supervision

4.  Identify unique issues related to confidentiality and liability

5.  Review relevant components of ACA Code of Ethics Sections F & H

2.  June Williams Phd, LPC-S and Michael Leeman Phd, LPC (GA) ,Holger Heap                Counseling Graduate Student - The relationship between early childhood                    trauma and later substance abuse

This session will provide an overview of the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and the later development of problems with substance use. The presenters will discuss how early childhood trauma and substance use both affect the brain in similar ways and discuss trauma-informed counseling interventions for working with adults who experienced early childhood trauma and later developed problems with substance use.

        Learning Objectives:

1.  Understand the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and later         substance use;

2.  Recognize that the areas of the brain that are affected by early childhood trauma are similar to the areas affected by later substance use, and

3.  Implement appropriate trauma-informed counseling interventions for individuals who experienced early childhood trauma and are currently experiencing problematic substance     use.

  1:30-4:45 pm   Workshop (3 CE hours)

1.  Deborah Schiller LPC, CSAT-S, CMAT-S - Dangerous Love: Personal and                      Professional Implications

The purpose of this presentation is to provide  opportunities for learning about therapeutic interventions, attachment styles, maladaptive defense mechanisms, and ethical considerations, which will lead to increased effectiveness in working with individuals and couples who exhibit unhealthy relationship characteristics.

Learning Objectives:

1.  Participants will be able to identify guidelines to determine therapeutic interventions which will assist them in addressing unhealthy relationship patterns in their clients.

2.  Participants will be able to describe how to increase therapeutic effectiveness when working with couples who struggle with problematic sexual behaviors.

3.  Participants will explore the dynamics involved in working with couples who exhibit           dysfunctional personality characteristics such as out of control anger, dependent traits,and   narcissism.

4.  Participants will gain increased knowledge of the impact adverse childhood events can have on attachment styles and why women stay with men who display potentially harmful behaviors.

5.  Participants will participate in a group discussion focusing on ethical considerations when helping clients address dangerous relationship dynamics.

  3:00-3:15 pm                    Networking Break

  3:15- 4:45 pm                   Breakout Sessions (1.5 CE hours)

  1. Peter Emerson, Ed.D, LPC-S & Leah Stone UCC Counselor Intern - Ethics Recognizing and Working with Impaired Counselors

This presentation is meant to provide the participant with information regarding various forms of counselor impairment, including how to recognize and remediate. Included will be a discussion on boundary issues and how they play a part in the counselor’s impairment. Developing healthy strategies to avoid impairment will also be discussed.

1.  Participants will become familiar with the kinds of impairment that are prevalent in the counseling profession.

2.  Participants will be more readily able to identify triggers that activate impairment.

3.  Participants will become more familiar with symptoms of counselor impairment.

4.  Participants will discuss and process boundary issues relevant to their own experiences.

5.  Participant will be able to identify more healthy coping strategies for dealing with impairment.