Graduate Faculty Research Interests

Graduate Faculty Research Interests


The table below gives a brief summary of the graduate faculty research interests. Please click on the name or the image for more detailed information.


Dr. Christopher Beachy

Dr. Christopher Beachy

Amphibian Biology.

 

We work on two related areas: (1) life history biology and (2) metamorphosis. 80% of animal species have a life history that includes a metamorphosis. We use surveys and experiments with amphibians that allow us to understand the relationship between metamorphosis and life history evolution.

We perform several kinds of studies but in particular we use (1) time-series collections of animals that allow us to elucidate life history parameters like growth rate, size/age at metamorphosis, and size/age at sexual maturation and (2) laboratory growth experiment with amphibian larvae wherein environmental variables that affect growth are manipulated and the outcome on timing and size at metamorphosis are observed.

Dr. Janice Bossart

Dr. Janice Bossart

Insect Evolutionary Ecology.

 

Determinants and dynamics of community composition in habitat islands; Biodiversity conservation, especially traits related to species persistence versus extinction; Evolutionary ecology of insect life-history traits relating to host plant and habitat use; Integration of local genetic pattern at the scale of landscapes and species; Historical and contemporary determinants of spatial genetic structure (both molecular and quantitative variation).

Dr. Gary Childers

Dr. Gary Childers

Environmental Microbiology.

 

Bacterial source tracking, enhancement of methanogens in coalbeds, and anaerobic microbial nutrient transformations using classical and molecular analyses.

Dr. Brian Crother

Dr. Brian Crother

Phylogenetic Systematics and Herpetology.

 

Evolution from a phylogenetic perspective; historical biogeography, historical ecology, patterns of gene evolution, patterns of species evolution, methodology and philosophy of phylogenetic analysis. In addition, engaged in survey work for the accumulation of long term data for amphibian and reptile populations in local wetlands.

Dr. William Font

Dr. William Font

Ecological Parasitology.

 

My students and I study the parasites of estuarine fishes and invertebrates. Hurricane Katrina has provided a new focus for these studies and we now conduct research related to changes in parasite and host communities associated with wetland restoration. Currently, with funding from the United States Environmental Protection Agency, we are assessing the threat of exotic zebra mussels which may spread into Louisiana wetlands via Mississippi River diversions that provide freshwater and sediments to rebuild wetlands near New Orleans. We are studying biological factors such as parasites, predators, and native molluscan competitors that may mitigate the spread of the non-native zebra mussel.

Dr. Cliff Fontenot

Dr. Cliff Fontenot

Herpetology.

 

My research interests include the behavioral and evolutionary ecology of amphibians and reptiles. My work focuses on salamander reproduction, alligator nesting and foraging ecology, turtle conservation, and garter snake ecology. In addition, my studies on the evolutionary ecology of garter snakes (Thamnophis) have led me in unexpected directions, e.g., how California paleogeology has influenced the evolution of amphibians and reptiles. My studies of garter snake foraging behavior developed into addressing how animals that have independently evolved eyes on land, have adapted to foraging underwater (because of the difference in refractive index). In addition, I am presently involved in a long-term study monitoring amphibian and reptile community assemblages in relationship to swamp degradation, focusing on the Lake Maurepas and Lake Ponchartrain ecosystems (in collaboration with Brian Crother).

Dr. Gary Howard

Dr. Gary Howard

Environmental Microbiology.

 

Molecular genetics and enzymology of polyurethane degradation. Microbial ecology of anaerobes involved in polyaromatic hydrocarbon degradation.

Dr. Rick Miller

Dr. Rick Miller

Plant Evolutionary Biology.

 

The evolution of ecologically important traits. Phylogenetic systematics of morning glories. Molecular genetics of the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway.

Dr. Nick Norton

Dr. Nick Norton

Cell Biology.

 

Scanning Electron Microscopy as an investigative tool supporting various interdisciplinary projects.

 

Dr. John O'Reilly

Dr. John O'Reilly

Neurophysiology.

 

Relationship between molecular structure and electrophysiological function in voltage-gated Na+ channels. Role of ion channels from excitable membranes in health & disease.

Dr. Kyle Piller

Dr. Kyle Piller

Ichthyology.

 

Systematics, evolution, ecology, and conservation genetics of North American freshwater fishes. Recent work includes systematic and taxonomic studies of darters ( Etheostoma) and suckers ( Ictiobus and Carpiodes) and conservation genetics of lake trout.

Dr. David Sever

Dr. David Sever

Herpetology.

 

Dr. Sever is well-known for over thirty years of work on the secondary sexual characters of salamanders, including the anatomy, function, and evolution of their skin glands and cloacal glands. Other studies done by Dr. Sever have involved ecology and behaviour, and he also discovered and named the species Eurycea junaluska, a salamander restricted to the southern Appalachian Mountains. His most recent work has involved the morphology and phylogeny of sperm storage and other aspects of the urogenital systems of Chondrichthyes, amphibians, and reptiles.

 

Dr. Gary Shaffer

Dr. Gary Shaffer

Wetlands Science and Statistical Ecology.

 

Isolating the mechanisms responsible for wetland health and habitat-state change through mesocosm and field studies. Landscape-scale restoration of swamps and marshes, bioremediation of small-scale oil spills, statistical modeling of ecosystem dynamics.

Dr. Penny Shockett

Dr. Penny Shockett

Molecular and Developmental Immunology.

 

Lymphocyte development and differentiation, generation of antigen receptor diversity, DNA recombination and repair.

Dr. Volker Stiller

Dr. Volker Stiller

Plant Ecophysiology.

 

I am broadly interested in how xylem structure supports xylem function. One aspect of this research is water transport and xylem cavitation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and its implications for gas-exchange and growth.

Dr. Roldan Valverde

Dr. Roldan Valverde

Vertebrate Physiology.

 

My main research interests are the comparative endocrinology of stress response, with emphasis in freshwater and marine turtles, and the nesting ecology of sea turtles.

Currently, my lab is focused on three different projects:
1)Impact of salinity on the endocrine stress response of the freshwater turtle in the Lake Pontchartrain Basin.
2) Development of a quantitative assay to detect endocrine disruption in the red-eared freshwater turtle.
3) Global estimate of mass nesting olive ridley sea turtles.

Dr. Erin Watson

Dr. Erin Watson

Forensic Entomology.

 

My research focuses on forensic entomology, carrion ecology, and the use of insects in determining postmortem intervals (or time since death) of human homicides and poached wildlife. Research interests include the carrion habitat, community structure, faunal succession, and development rates of necrophilous insects, animal and human myiasis, and interactions between Calliphoridae, microbes, and decaying remains.

 

Dr. Mary White

Dr. Mary White

Molecular Systematics and Evolution of Development.

 

Systematics of squamates using multiple nuclear genes. Evolution of mechanisms of germ cell determination in verterbrates.



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